2020 EXPO | Aug 16-19

Alcohol training and prevention of over-serving

EXPO Certification Seminar:
Alcohol training and prevention of over-serving


2019 university 2019 final2In the gentlemen’s establishments where it’s allowed, alcohol can be a boon for profits — but serving alcohol also comes with risk and responsibilities. Trevor Estelle of Health Communications Inc. will teach attendees at EXPO 2019 how to prevent over-serving and handling the customers who’ve had too many.

As long as there has been alcohol, there has been over consumption. Anyone who has been to a nightclub, bar, gentlemen’s club, sports bar — anywhere that serves alcohol — is privy to this fact.
The 2019 Gentlemen’s Club EXPO isn’t providing certification to grasp this notion. Rather, the Responsible Alcohol “Over-Serving” Class will help gentlemen’s club staff prevent over-serving a club guest, which can not only prevent huge club lawsuits but can also save lives.

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Proper Use of Force

EXPO Certification Seminar:
Proper Use of Force


2019 university 2019 final2Robert Smith, president of Nightclub Security Consultants, is presenting this very specific training certification seminar at EXPO 2019, and will explain how it can result in fewer lawsuits, fewer police calls and lower insurance premiums.

As a 31-year-old rookie police officer in San Diego, Robert Smith didn’t understand why other, younger, rookie officers didn’t talk their way out of using force.
And when he had to use force as a police offer and detective, he never had a complaint against him for excessive force or even perceived force — because he made it a point to learn and understand the Law Enforcement Force Continuum.

As such, he’ll be delivering the Proper Use of Force Training Certification seminar at the 2019 Gentlemen’s Club EXPO.
“Using the Law Enforcement Force Continuum as a model, I have molded it to suit the hospitality industry and this was very crucial for what I wanted to teach my clients,” says Smith. “The teaching of proper use of force has been critical in gaining popularity among national insurance carriers and brokers who mandate our training as a condition of insurance for the club or bar.”
ED Magazine spoke with Smith about the practical skills attendees will learn at the seminar and the cost-benefit analysis proper certification can yield for club owners and operators.

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Preventing Chargebacks

EXPO Certification Seminar:
Preventing Chargebacks


2019 university 2019 final2Chargebacks are an unfortunate reality of the gentlemen’s club industry, but as Dan Neistadt, President of Electronic Merchant Services will demonstrate at EXPO 2019, there are several key steps clubs can take to prevent them.

According to the Nilson Report, which tracks the credit card industry, Visa and Mastercard were responsible for more than $13 trillion in global transactions in 2016.
That’s a lot of money. And, not all of it was honest. Cards get stolen, people can be duplicitous, mistakes happen.
You add in alcohol, carnal allure and buyer’s remorse (after all, try explaining to corporate why you spent $5,000 at a strip club) and it’s not hard to see why gentlemen’s clubs are a haven for chargebacks.
Dan Neistadt sat on the acquiring committees for both Visa and Mastercard and has been the president of Electronic Merchant Services for a dozen years. Neistadt has been in the merchant services business in various capacities for 30-plus years, which means he knows more than a thing or two about credit card chargebacks.
“I’ve got a lot of history in this,” chuckles Neistadt, who is presenting the Credit Card “Chargeback” Specialist Certification.
ED Magazine spoke with Neistadt about chargebacks and how being proactive is one of the most useful tools to utilize.
 
ED: This isn’t just a standard EXPO seminar; your training certification seminar is offering very specific advice on a very specific subject. What practical skills will attendees of your training seminar walk away with?
NEISTADT: This will be a primer on chargebacks, what is a chargeback, what is the process associated with a chargeback, what happens when you get a chargeback, how to combat them and alternatives to minimize chargebacks.

ED:
What’s the biggest misconception about chargebacks you hope to clear up with this seminar?
NEISTADT: The biggest misconception would be, and there are a lot of them, is this: Are they avoidable? And then, what do you do when you get one? Do you roll over, or do you represent it? And if you lose a representment, what happens when you go to arbitration? And if you lose in arbitration, are there alternatives from there? In my opinion, the club should go on the offensive rather than on the defensive, because they have the ammunition.

“(Preventing chargebacks) is a very serious job because it has financial impacts to the club, so the people who should be (at EXPO) are not necessarily only the owners, but the individuals they have delegated to handle their chargeback processes. Asking a bartender, ‘Do you remember?’ isn’t going to cut it.” - Dan Neistadt

ED: Why is it crucial for staff to attend, as opposed to just club owners acting as delegates?
NEISTADT: My view on a chargeback, especially in a chargeback-heavy industry like clubs can be, is that it’s a full-time job. It’s a very serious job because it has financial impacts to the club, so the people who should be (at EXPO) are not necessarily only the owners, but the individuals they have delegated to handle their chargeback processes. Asking a bartender “Do you remember?” isn’t going to cut it. But I know everyone that comes to this seminar will come away with much better knowledge on this critical subject.

ED: Do card companies tend to take the bank’s side more heavily when resolving cases with the gentlemen’s club industry versus other industries?
NEISTADT: This industry is a bit different because a majority of the chargebacks come about from family fraud. (Note: family fraud is essentially when a known party steals or manipulates your credit card information without your knowledge) It’s hard to have family fraud in this industry because you have a live body in front of you. Family fraud is more prevalent in the internet businesses. I would think you have a better chance of winning in a chargeback situation than an internet-based company would have. Depending on the amount of the chargeback, I would always represent it, I would fight it.

ED: What are some of the most common mistakes club operators make when accepting credit cards from customers, especially on high-dollar tabs?
NEISTADT: Alcohol or drugs, the person is drunk or high. Part of the problem is you mix tabs so you don’t separate the bar from other entertainment offered, and then you don’t fight the chargeback. There are things you could do to go to the company. For instance, if a person takes a young lady into a side VIP room, there should be a separate agreement they sign. Or maybe you get a picture of an individual at the time they sign their tab. Those are the kind of things you can start to do to protect yourself.
 
For more information, visit emscorporate.com or check out Dan at the Credit Card “Chargeback” Specialist Certification seminar at the 2019 Gentlemen’s Club EXPO.

 

Team Leadership

EXPO Certification Seminar:
Team Leadership


2019 university 2019 final2One of the industry’s own, professional motivational speaker and author Willard Barth, has seen all rungs of the gentlemen’s club industry. As such,he is the perfect person to present the EXPO’s training certification seminar on effective team leadership.

Sure, there are a lot of motivational speakers out there, some more effective than others. Not only is Willard Barth one of the better ones—as anyone who witnessed his seminar at EXPO 2015 in New Orleans can attest—he also has something that most motivational speakers don’t have. Specifically, he worked in the gentlemen’s club industry for several years before pursuing his next career as a speaker and author. This makes him a uniquely valuable EXPO seminar speaker.
“I am eternally grateful for the adult entertainment industry because it allowed me to fund my education and fund businesses I was starting that led to me being able to now do what I do full time,” says Barth, a nationally recognized speaker and expert on business leadership who is presenting the Club Management “Team Leadership” Certification.
“What makes me potentially different than some of the other people out there, I’ve been in the trenches,” Barth adds.  “I started out in a club where I was getting $25 shift pay, and no mandatory minimum tip out, where I was making maybe $50 at the end of the night to working one of the top clubs in New York City on Broadway where I was running 100 girls a night. I’ve been through every part of that spectrum.”
ED Magazine spoke with Barth about the practical skills attendees will learn at the seminar and how leadership is often misconstrued.

ED: This isn’t just a standard EXPO seminar; your training certification seminar is offering very specific advice on a very specific subject. What practical skills will attendees of your training seminar walk away with?
BARTH: One of the things I’ve learned over 30 years of working in personal and professional business development is success leaves clues. If you want to replicate the success of someone else who’s in your club or another club, there are four key areas to identify and then repeat, and duplicate that process. We’re going to be teaching that formula of what you need to identify and then apply. If you follow this recipe, you’ll be able to cut the learning curve down 25% or less of the time it would normally take you to succeed.
This applies cross-contextually. The formula has been used by entertainers, by CEOs, people in relationships — it’s one of these universal frameworks. You plug in the barback, or entertainer, or security staff or the owner — the strategy might be 2019 barthdifferent, but the framework is always consistent.

“Leadership is not about a title. It’s not about a position. Leadership is actually about your ability to communicate effectively with the people you work with and bring the best out in them.” - Willard Barth

ED: What’s the biggest misconception about leadership you hope to clear up with this seminar?
BARTH: Leadership is not about a title. It’s not about a position. Leadership is actually about your ability to communicate effectively with the people you work with and bring the best out in them. Many people think just because they get a promotion or because they have certain tenure, they believe that’s leadership and that has nothing to do with it.

ED: Why is it crucial for staff to attend, as opposed to just club owners acting as delegates?
BARTH: When you combine the economy we’re in with all these changes in the (gentlemen’s club) industry with the lawsuits and everything else, there are still some people doing extremely well with those challenges. The idea behind this presentation is how to identify what the top performer is doing, no matter what their role is, and be able to replicate their results. This framework came from studying the most successful people in different industries and different fields and determining the common thread.

ED: Can you talk a bit about the importance of great leadership, and how leading properly from the top affects everyone else in the club?
BARTH: Often, leaders are scared that if they train other people to be phenomenal leaders, they’re going to be out of a position. They’re not going to be needed. But the role of a leader is not to stand at the front and manage. Most people confuse leadership with managing, which is, I’ll put together the protocol and make sure all of you are following it. A leader’s role is to create more leaders, to create more people who can replace them. You’re not just teaching them the step-by-step procedures, you’re teaching them about a mindset.

For more information, visit willardbarthenterprises.com.

 

 

S.M.I.L.E. program for DJs

EXPO Seminar:
S.M.I.L.E. program for DJs


Tired of seeing blown profits in the DJ booths he was visiting, Michael DeSuno (aka DJ Platypus) created a program that any DJ at any club can use to up their game—and the club’s bottom line.

To hear Michael DeSuno, aka DJ Platypus, put it bluntly: The number-one function of a club DJ is NOT simply to play music.
“The main objective of the DJ position is to sell alcohol,” says DeSuno. “From the music selection to the energy of the room, there are many components. The way the DJ does in-house promotion also effects alcohol sales.”
DeSuno, the corporate head of DJs for the RCI Hospitality club chain, and head DJ at Tootsie’s, DeSuno has seen DJs of all calibers in all types of gentlemen’s club environs. So it’s not without intensive first-hand research DeSuno created the S.M.I.L.E. program for DJs.
Spelled out, S.M.I.L.E. stands for sell, market, interact, lead, and entertain. ED spoke with DeSuno about the S.M.I.L.E. program and how it will literally put a smile on club owners’ and operators’ faces because of its positive financial impact.

ED: Why is this a must-attend seminar for club DJs and even managers?
DESUNO: I feel there is a major disconnect between DJs and management. This program is used as a checklist that provides the DJ group with core principals that enhance the overall guest experience as well as increase revenue. The way this 2019 dj plat award 2017program is laid out ensures that each DJ is working in conjunction with the floor staff and management to achieve team goals.

“If your DJ understands the methods of selling on the microphone, your business will increase sales. If your DJ is marketing the club properly with social media as well as in-house promotions, you will increase your guest count.” - Mike DeSuno

ED: How has utilizing this S.M.I.L.E. method helped you specifically, as well as the other DJs you may have trained?
DESUNO: It keeps DJs very organized. Focusing on these five points gives the DJ staff the proper direction and insures accountability both inside and outside the club. This program highlights what every professional DJ should be focused on to not only increase revenue but to provide the ultimate guest experience. That experience is invaluable to the success of the entertainers and bar staff as the DJ will assist in other areas, including suggestive selling, club marketing, crowd interaction, leading by example and entertaining guests. Using this program has increased our sales. It has also kept our team very organized and focused, freeing up time for the creative process to make our events a better experience for our guests.

ED: Bottom line: how will this S.MI.L.E. method make DJs and clubs more money?
DESUNO: Most DJs have not had proper training. The S.M.I.L.E. program refines the new process of doing business. If your DJ understands the methods of selling on the microphone, your business will increase sales. If your DJ is marketing the club properly with social media as well as in-house promotions, you will increase your guest count. If your DJ is properly interacting with your guest, this will elevate the guest experience providing word-of-mouth advertisement for your business. Your DJ is the voice of your club, a representation of the brand. A leader on your team that leads by example sets a tone for the rest of your staff to follow, making your team strive for success. When your DJ puts the final touch on this program and can properly entertain your guests with both the music and verbally on the microphone, your guests will stay longer, increasing sales altogether. The DJ will make the overall experience better for the entertainers as a result, opening an opportunity for a higher revenue stream extending the entertainer-DJ relationship for a better overall work environment for all parties.

For more information, check out DJ Platypus at the DJ S.M.I.L.E. seminar at the 2019 Gentlemen’s Club EXPO or email djplat10@gmail.com.

 

 

 

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